This rule might sound like bad news for your email marketing campaign, but it can actually improve your open and clickthrough rates. Limiting your subscriber list to just those who specifically asked to join you will ensure only the most interested people are receiving your messages. This maximizes the chances that you'll convert readers to qualified leads as a result of an email send.
I've been using Solo Ad Advertising for about half a year now... It was the most responsive advertising I EVER used in terms of RESULTS and, by this, I mean signups and SALES not just clicks on my solos... I used Solo Ad Advertising to promote other ad exchanges and, once, for example, I had a referral upgrade ratio of more than 12%, much better than the general upgrade ratio of that ad exchange... Using Solo Ad Advertising to promote other Ad Exchanges helped me A LOT to earn hundreds of dollars from my referral upgrades and purchases and also from scoring on the top 3 of some referral contests.
Presentation is everything, or so they say. With this old adage in mind, we’ve compiled our best tips for anyone who wants to send emails that subscribers click into a handy email design guide. We cover each facet of design: content, templates, identity, color, images, layout, fonts, and calls to action. Design is as much science as it is art, and we take the guesswork out of what can seem like the most challenging part of sending good emails.
Using a email solo ad, to market your website is possibly the most acepted type of internet marketing, if not the most popular. Solo Ads, is possibly the best form of Solo email marketing, but it can be expensive if you do it on its own and to not combine advertising efforts with other options of marketing. Therefore, I recommend merging solo marketing, with things like manual traffic exchange, social networking and banner marketing. I must say there is no precise way of proving, which is the […]
Full-funnel campaigns also take into consideration how the marketing funnel has morphed over the years. The old school of thought had a top, middle, and bottom part of a funnel, where customers went in at the top and left it after making a purchase. The funnel has evolved into a customer lifecycle that includes those pre- and post-purchase phases mentioned earlier.
To make sure you're only sending emails to the people who want to read them, clean up your email list so that it excludes recipients who haven't opened a certain amount of emails in the campaign's recent history. This makes sure your emails' open and clickthrough rates reflect only your most interested readers, allowing you to collect more effective data on what is and isn't working in each email you send.
Make it scannable. Your subscribers are busy people who get a lot of email, so it's safe to assume you don't have their undivided attention. Instead of one long block, break up your content into short paragraphs. Include subheadings and images to guide readers through your email and make it easier to scan, and add a teaser to the top of your newsletter to tell subscribers what's in store. If you're sending a long article, consider inserting a "read more" link so people can get to the rest when it's convenient for them. Your subject line should be to-the-point and easy to digest, too. You might even want to a/b test subject lines to see which ones perform best.

When you're using email as a marketing tool, you're working on a pretty personal basis. This isn't ‘drive-by' stuff -you're directly targeting customers from their inboxes. There's a huge amount of potential which comes with this kind of marketing... but you'll only reap that potential if you REALLY understand both the marketplace you're operating from, and the audience you're talking to.

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