Sometimes low-hanging fruit is as easy as it looks. Personalizing emails, as well as segmenting them—a marketing technique that teases out your subscriber list to send relevant emails to specific subscribers—can offer significant returns. Segmenting emails allows you to target specific groups of subscribers, which leads to substantial increases in click-through rate.

Email marketing has always been Permission based, but is silently replaced with its brother; Tease Marketing, continuously building on a brand relationship based on mutual interest. The challenge becomes presenting an – already in itself – appealing and attractive message. But how to benchmark your email marketing efforts to fit that new train of thought?


Hello Steven, first of all I want to thank you for posting such a informative article. Email is an essential part of our digital life. I didn't have any prior knowledge about email marketing before reading this article. But frankly sepaking now I am keen to know more about email marketing. Informations , data about email marketing and visulization style which are used, makes this article more attractive. Thank you for putting such effort.

Make it shareable. Send content that people want to share, and make it easy for them to do it. Sure, subscribers can forward your campaign to friends, but that's a lot to ask. Include a public link to the web version of your campaign so people can read it outside of their email programs, and consider adding Twitter and Facebook links to your newsletter, so readers can share your content where they're already active. When their friends start sharing and subscribing, you'll know it's working.
Lengthy paragraphs are off-putting, but I do appreciate that brevity is a tricky skill to master! If you struggle with short copy, write your main body copy out in the manner that feels natural, and then take a (metaphorical) knife to it afterwards. You’ll be amazed at what can be cut without losing any of the sense or feel of the piece. If you really can’t cut it down, try chopping your copy into sections, or offering a ‘Read More’ option leading to the website.
When you're using email as a marketing tool, you're working on a pretty personal basis. This isn't ‘drive-by' stuff -you're directly targeting customers from their inboxes. There's a huge amount of potential which comes with this kind of marketing... but you'll only reap that potential if you REALLY understand both the marketplace you're operating from, and the audience you're talking to.
Yes, it is. According to the recent marketing study done by Psychology Today, people rationalize buying decisions with logic, but they make buying decisions based on feelings. This means, when the right brain cells are triggered, people will buy regardless of time limitations, budget limitations or knowledge limitations. That's why, as long as basic demographic targeting is in place (African citizens aren't likely to have a credit card so it's no use asking them to purchase something on the internet where all purchases are done through credit cards), the only parameter which qualifies a buyer is their emotional state. And that's exactly what you get with Igor Solo Ads. Emotionally-engaged prospects who have decided to suspend rational thinking and skepticism for a while, giving you a shot at making your case and signing up into your business opportunity.
Edit. Even editors need editors. When you're working on your publishing calendar, leave plenty of time for the editing and revision process. Once you send a campaign, it goes straight to the inbox, and you can't go back and update it. Newsletters contain meaningful content, and sloppy ones reflect poorly on the companies who send them. Grammar and style are just as important for email as they are for websites and blogs.
The subject line should link seamlessly to your main headline and then to the lead copy and into the body of the email. Ensure that the subject line is relevant to the content and incites a relevant expectation – clickbait is bad, folks! Open rates are not the only metrics by which to measure success (I’ve heard it said that open rates are ‘vanity’ and clickthroughs are ‘sanity’).

If you're doing something right, and it's making an impact, your competitors will pick up on it. If your competitors start changing their own strategies and tactics, and if it seems like they might be doing this in response to your campaign, it's worth looking into. Identify your main competitors and analyse how their own email messaging has changed (if at all) during your campaign.

When you’re working with marketing emails, always think about recipients on an individual level. Consider where each recipient is on their journey with you. Notice opens, click-throughs – any engagements or behaviours, and pin down behavioural patterns which often point to purchase. Every time you send out an email campaign, you'll be collecting behavioural data, use it to inform your email strategy.
A trigger can also be a passive customer behavior, such as not opening your last few emails, not logging in to use your service for a while, or downloading a product without downloading the tutorial or an important related resource. These types of drip campaigns can help re-engage customers who were moving through the customer lifecycle but have somehow gotten “stuck.”
Hello, Steven. Nice article. You have hit the nail on the head. I too believe that both old and new marketing needs to compliment each other to get the desired result. I feel that with data from new marketing solution like social media shall be added to old tools like email marketing and direct mailers to make them more efficient and bring real business value. Thanks for highlighting the points.
Newsletters are long-haul engagement. They serve as check-ins with your subscribers, as well as offering generalised engagement points. Newsletters are a way of both driving and maintaining engagement – at worst they serve as a reminder of the relationship the recipient has with a brand, but usually, they do a lot more. Provide as many engagement points/links as you can within your newsletters, and you'll be surprised at what crops up!
Alternatively, at least, an eye-catching design. It’s worth letting a proper designer have a go at prettifying your emails. Customers are often opening emails on the go, so you need to work hard to grab their attention. Making your emails nice to look at is a brilliant way to hold their eye. Netflix put time and effort into making their emails stand out, personally and visually – and it pays off for them!
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